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Virgin Islands struggles to subpoena Google’s Larry Page in Jeffrey Epstein lawsuit against JPMorgan


US Virgin Islands is attempting to subpoena Google co-founder Larry Page as part of its lawsuit against JPMorgan Chase over its role in Jeffrey Epstein’s sex trafficking ring — but can’t seem to find Page to serve him the documents, a court filing revealed on Thursday.

The Virgin Islands government wants to subpoena the 50-year-old billionaire Google exec because it believes Page may have had a connection to the convicted pedophile, who was a JPMorgan client.

Page “is a high-net-worth individual who Epstein may have referred or attempted to refer to JPMorgan,” the court documents read.

The original lawsuit was filed against the big bank in December 2022. It claimed that JPMorgan “turned a blind eye to evidence of human trafficking over more than a decade because of Epstein’s own financial footprint, and because of the deals and clients that Epstein brought and promised to bring to the bank.”

Page is believed to be one of those referenced clients, and this isn’t the first time the Virgin Islands government has tried to serve a subpoena on Page to uncover more.

A previous attempt to subpoena Page was made on April 11, the court filing said, and the government “made good-faith attempts to obtain an address for Larry Page, including hiring an investigative firm to search public records databases for possible addresses.”

“Our process server attempted service at the addresses identified by our investigative firm, but discovered the addresses were not valid for Mr. Page,” the documents said.


The government of the US Virgin Islands is attempting to subpoena billionaire Google co-founder Larry Page, 50, but can’t locate him.
AP

Thus, the government is asking Manhattan federal court Judge Jed Rakoff “for order authorizing alternative service of subpoena,” meaning the subpoena could be delivered via mail or handed off to a third party to give to Page.

Page — who still works at Alphabet, Google’s parent company — remains largely out of the public eye. And although it’s unclear where he resides, legal documents obtained by Insider revealed Page owns four islands and reportedly spent much of the pandemic hiding out in Fiji.

Three of Page’s islands are located in the Caribbean, Hand Lollik, its neighboring Little Hans Lollik, and Eustatia Island, while Tavarua lies west of the main Fijian island.


It's unclear where Page is located, but he was spotted on Tavarua (pictured), an island he owns in Fiji, during the pandemic.
It’s unclear where Page is located, but he was spotted on Tavarua (pictured), an island he owns in Fiji, during the pandemic.
Alamy Stock Photo

Jeffrey Epstein
In Thursday’s court filing, it was also “revealed that JPMorgan financially profited from the deposits made by Epstein … in exchange for its known facilitation of and implicit participation in Epstein’s sex trafficking venture.”
AP

Two sources told Insider that they saw Page on the island during the pandemic. One source said that he was spotted hydro foiling — a type of surging where the board is elevated above water — with his wife, Lucinda Southworth.

Page isn’t the only billionaire businessman the US Virgin Islands has subpoenaed for their link to Epstein and JPMorgan. Previous subpoenas have been issued to fellow Google co-founder Sergey Brin, Hyatt Hotels chairman Thomas Pritzker, big-time media exec Mortimer Zuckerman, and former CAA talent agency chairman Michael Ovitz.

This is all part of the government’s attempts to sue JPMorgan for its participation in Epstein’s ongoing abuse of girls and young women, which was believed to have primarily taken place at Epstein’s residence in the Virgin Islands.

In Thursday’s filing, it was also “revealed that JPMorgan financially profited from the deposits made by Epstein … in exchange for its known facilitation of and implicit participation in Epstein’s sex trafficking venture.”



This story originally appeared on NYPost

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